Brian Lehrer WNYC

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Brian Lehrer leads the conversation about what matters most now in local and national politics, our own communities and our lives.
Updated: 4 hours 16 min ago

Republicans Decide to Wait out Obamacare

Wed, 2017-07-19 10:32

Joan Walsh, MSNBC political analyst and national affairs correspondent for The Nation, and Ana Marie Cox, host of the podcast With Friends like These, founder of the blog Wonkette, and contributor to The New York Times Magazine, discuss what's next for the GOP health bill, including the President's call to wait for Obamacare to "fail."

"[Trump] is not waiting for Obamacare to fail — he’s killing it," said Walsh. "We have to make clear that’s what they’re doing."

Making It in America; Race Legacy of the Southern Baptist Convention

Wed, 2017-07-19 00:00

Jamil Smith fills in for Brian all week. On today's show you'll hear:

  • As President Trump is touting his "Made In America" week, Drew Harvell, national business reporter at The Washington Post, talks about the challenges American companies face when trying to manufacture goods here, and hire workers here, plus listeners share what  American goods their companies make.
  • Lawrence Ware, co-director of the Africana Studies Program at Oklahoma State University, discusses his recent New York Times op-ed that explains his decision to leave the Southern Baptist Convention and how the 2016 election unearthed a legacy of racial intolerance that propelled him to speak out.

Had it Up to Here With the Subway?

Tue, 2017-07-18 12:25

Emma Fitzsimmons, transit reporter for The New York Times, discusses what it means to be a New Yorker in this age of subway dysfunction, and how the MTA has become an unwelcome intrusion in our social and economic lives. Listeners had a lot to say about how the so-called "Summer of Hell" is impacting their work and personal lives.

Entered a car where the AC wasn't working this morning and remembered back a time when that would be awful. "How quaint" I said to myself.

— sparnon (@sparnon) July 18, 2017

The MTA's priorities are also off. My usual R stop is closed for 6-8 months so they can install USB ports. No one wants that #summerofhell

— Chloe (@chloegoodhart) July 18, 2017

It's not just MTA, I was 50 mins late to work cause if NJ Transit Bus/Port Authority. It's as if NY/NJ is pushing residents to move.

— Livvy Hime (@LivvyHime) July 18, 2017

 

Some listeners are ditching the MTA altogether and finding alternate ways to get to work:

NYC cant lead in environmental sustainability without excellent Public transportion. Shortfalls in service cause me to drive instead

— Dara Oshin (@daraoshin) July 18, 2017

I stopped taking @MTA to work for the most part and am using @CitiBikeNYC most days. It's much more pleasant!

— Viscountess Sharilyn (@sharilyn) July 18, 2017

Civics Lessons for a Stronger Democracy

Tue, 2017-07-18 12:05

L. Joy Williams, President of the Brooklyn National Association for the Advanced of Colored People (NAACP), creator and host of Sunday Civics podcast, explains the importance of civic action, and argues it falls to schools to teach students how to become active participants in democracy at an early age. 

@ljoywilliams weighs in on the ideals of American citizenship that marginalized people and immigrants bring to civics. pic.twitter.com/lUsPDJ0NqH

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 18, 2017

YES. Something I encourage my students to do. You cannot fully engage without knowing what YOU believe. https://t.co/56VFfDyEK2

— Kelly Dittmar (@kdittmar) July 18, 2017

Is the End of Campus Greek Culture Near?

Tue, 2017-07-18 11:01

A faculty committee at Harvard has recommended the university phase out fraternities, sororities and final clubs. Alexandra Brodsky, civil rights attorney & Skadden Fellow at National Women's Law Center and co-founder Know Your IX, talks about the kind of culture the faculty committee is trying to end at Harvard, including hazing, binge drinking, rape culture and bigotry. 

Scrap em.

— Joel Creasy (@the_real_JoelC) July 18, 2017

institutions like Harvard are rife with class-exclusive clubs, not just sex-exclusive, that the move serves to scrutinize (if bluntly) (2/2)

— Kevin Hazlett (@k_hazlett) July 18, 2017

@BrianLehrer In 1972 in college I was invited to a Harvard party and when I got there it was a sport to see how many girls would go.

— Ann Reed (@51Reed) July 18, 2017

 

But not everyone agreed that the onus is on the fraternities themselves:

Fraternity culture is a product of campus culture. If the school is permissive of negative behavior, the groups will live up to that.

— Evangeline Warren (@alinzar) July 18, 2017

Republicans Still Looking to Chalk up a Win

Tue, 2017-07-18 10:30

Evan Siegfried, Republican strategist and commentator and author of GOP GPS: How to Find the Millennials and Urban Voters the Republican Party Needs to Survive (Skyhorse Publishing, 2016) discusses the Republican party's strategy to repeal Obamacare to chalk up a win with their base, but their tactic might be turning some GOP voters away. Republican listeners call to weigh in on how they feel about their party's political moves.

Tuesday Morning Politics; Living the Subway Life; We Need To Teach Civics In Schools

Tue, 2017-07-18 00:00

Jamil Smith fills in for Brian today. You'll hear:

  • Evan Siegfried, Republican strategist and commentator and the author of GOP GPS: How to Find the Millennials and Urban Voters the Republican Party Needs to Survive (Skyhorse Publishing, 2016), talks about the national political news of the day.
  • Emma Fitzsimmons, transit reporter for The New York Times, discusses what it means to be a New Yorker in this age of subway dysfunction, and how the MTA has become an unwelcome intrusion in our social and economic lives.
  • L. Joy Williams, president of the Brooklyn National Association for the Advanced of Colored People (NAACP) and creator and host of Sunday Civics podcast, explains the importance of civic action, and argues it falls to schools to teach students how to become active participants in democracy at an early age.

Who Does The Constitution Serve?

Mon, 2017-07-17 12:04

Vincent Warren, the executive director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, kicks off our  week-long dive into the state of the Constitution and our institutions — who they serve and who’s left out.

The Many Intellectual Achievements of 'Race Women' Throughout History

Mon, 2017-07-17 11:56

Brittney Cooper, assistant professor of women's and gender studies and Africana studies at Rutgers, co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective and author of Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women (University of Illinois Press, 2017) talks about how African-American women throughout history shaped the intellectual conversation on race and gender.

@ProfessorCrunk weighs in on what's "at the heart of" respectability politics with @JamilSmith. pic.twitter.com/K26jKqLc7J

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 17, 2017

@BrianLehrer I LOVE the guest & her argument right now. We have always been "respectable." Respectability has never saved us.

— Shani Bruno (@shanibruno) July 17, 2017

How New York City Can Keep Its Artists

Mon, 2017-07-17 11:12

There are more artists than ever in NYC and spread throughout the 5 boroughs, but the need for work space is an ongoing struggle. Jonathan Bowles, executive director of the Center for an Urban Future, reviews the numbers and a new proposal to help retain them.

.@BrianLehrer It's too late for NYC to fix the problem of keeping artists there. That should've happened already.

— Leela Corman (@LeelaOfNewYork) July 17, 2017

@BrianLehrer I lived in NYC in 70s and 80s & it was affordable! Apts in UWS for $350. Many artist settled Soho - Now NYC couldn't care less.

— Global Info (@news_globalinfo) July 17, 2017

Also risk to NY art scene: good gallery space so expensive to chase them out.

— Robert Hadow (@BestInFlightLDJ) July 17, 2017

A TRussia Timeline

Mon, 2017-07-17 10:31

Michael Isikoff, chief investigative correspondent at Yahoo News, talks about the latest on the investigations into the Trump campaign and Russia, including a timeline of meetings with Russian officials and corresponding statements made on the campaign trail.

TRussia Today; How to Retain the Artists; African-American Women in History; Who Does The Constitution Serve?

Mon, 2017-07-17 00:00

Jamil Smith fills in for Brian for the week. Coming up on today's show:

  • Michael Isikoff, chief investigative correspondent at Yahoo News, talks about the latest on the investigations into the Trump campaign and Russia and other national news.
  • There are more artists than ever in NYC and spread throughout the 5 boroughs, but the need for workspace is an ongoing struggle. Jonathan Bowles, executive director of the Center for an Urban Future, reviews the numbers and a new proposal to help retain them.
  • Brittney Cooper, assistant professor of women's and gender studies and Africana studies at Rutgers, co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective and author of Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women (University of Illinois Press, 2017), talks about how African-American women throughout history shaped the intellectual conversation on race and gender.
  • Vincent Warren, executive director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, kicks off our week-long dive into the state of the Constitution and our institutions — who they serve and who’s left out.

Brian Lehrer Weekend: What's Really Behind Trump's Voter Fraud Commission, The Climate is Probably Doomed, Eulogy for the Old Kosciuszko Bridge

Fri, 2017-07-14 13:00

In case you missed them, hear three of our favorite segments from the week:

What's Really Behind Trump's Voter Fraud Commission? (First) | The Climate is Probably Doomed (Starts 25:48) | Farewell, Old Kosciuszko Bridge (Starts 49:38)

If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

How Bastille Day Celebrations Differ from the 4th of July

Fri, 2017-07-14 12:04

Listeners from France or any other country call in and describe their home country's national holiday and how it compares to the 4th of July.

Caller Jean says in France, the Bastille Day celebration takes place in center of village w/music, dancing. Here it feels more separate.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

Elaine in Queens on Jamaica's independence -- there's "a lot of merriment." But she thinks Americans go overboard - bc they can afford it.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

Listener says 4th of July celebrates an event, independence, whereas Bastille Day celebrates an uprising against the oppressive monarchy.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

Plus: A French army marching band covered of a medley of Daft Punk songs for President Trump and French President Macron:

The Implications of Sheldon Silver's Overturned Corruption Conviction

Fri, 2017-07-14 11:37

A federal appeals court has overturned the corruption conviction of Sheldon Silver, former New York Assembly Speaker. Jimmy Vielkind, Politico New York's Albany bureau chief and New York State Senator Todd Kaminsky discuss the court's decisions and its broader implications.

State Sen @toddkaminsky: Silver's case "reveals a much larger gap in the state's ability to criminalize actions that people know are wrong."

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

@JimmyVielkind points out Gov. Cuomo "really did nothing" in the last session to push for ethics reform.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

"The public anger will dissipate and nothing will happen." @JimmyVielkind to @BrianLehrer on Albany's endless scandals and coverups.

— Michael Kink (@mkink) July 14, 2017

State Sen. @toddkaminsky says he's not advocating for a NYS constitutional convention.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

Neera Tanden Digs Into the Latest on TRussia and the Health Care Bill

Fri, 2017-07-14 11:06

Neera Tandenpresident & CEO of Center for American Progress and former senior adviser to President Obama and Senator Clinton, talks about the latest developments in the Trump-Russia investigation and looks into the new health care bill.

"We are just at the tip of the iceberg of the Russia issue...I'm glad he's [the special prosecutor] investigating." --@neeratanden.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

@neeratanden says "it strains credulity" that all of this is a massive coincidence.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

@neeratanden on health care bill's Cruz amendment: if you need pre-existing conditions protection, you'll be priced out of the market.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

Throughout this debate, Republicans seem to oppose the idea of insurance itself w/r/t pooling risk, etc. -- @neeratanden.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

Ask the Mayor: Subways, Property Taxes, Police Body Cams and More

Fri, 2017-07-14 10:34

New York City mayor Bill de Blasio takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in NYC.

@NYCMayor says we definitely don't need a Robert Moses of transit; too much power for one person. Plus, Moses was "racist and classist."

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 14, 2017

yes! In undergrad urban planning classes we were taught "you don't have to like Moses, but you have to THINK BIG like Moses"

— katie (@katieraffa) July 14, 2017

"I've got plenty of will to push the MTA," the Mayor tells @BrianLehrer in response to NYT editorial board & call for political will.

— Ben Max (@TweetBenMax) July 14, 2017

"dangerous concept" -BdB tells @BrianLehrer of letting courts instead of electeds reform property tax system. Says he'd do it term 2.

— Ben Max (@TweetBenMax) July 14, 2017

#AskTheMayor; Silver's Corruption Conviction: Overturned

Fri, 2017-07-14 00:00

Coming up on today's show:

  • Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City, takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in NYC.
  • A federal appeals court has overturned the corruption conviction of Sheldon Silver, former New York Assembly Speaker. Jimmy Vielkind, Politico New York's Albany bureau chief, discusses the court's decisions and its broader implications.

Looking for Transparency on Trump's Deregulation Task Forces

Thu, 2017-07-13 12:02

Danielle Ivory, reporter at The New York Times covering the Trump administration, and Robert Faturechi, reporter at ProPublica covering politics, discuss their investigation into the Trump administration's special deregulation team, led by hires with deep industry ties. And so far it has been no easy feat. Ivory and Faturechi are in the midst of investigating who is part of the teams trying to aggressively scale back government regulations. But the effort is being done with very little transparency.  

"We filed tons of FOIAs just to get the names of these folks," says @RobertFaturechi abt who is even on the special deregulation team.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) July 13, 2017

 

Ivory and Faturechi's investigation is ongoing and they are asking for help: Got a tip? Email taskforce@nytimes.com or contact Danielle Ivory on the encrypted messaging app Signal at 917-280-2607. 

We're Maybe, Probably, Mostly Doomed

Thu, 2017-07-13 11:35

David Wallace-Wells, deputy editor at New York Magazine and Michael Oppenheimer, professor of Geosciences and International Affairs at Princeton University, discuss the scientific evidence laid out in Wallace-Wells' recent article, "The Uninhabitable Earth." After the article came out, Wallace-Wells got a lot of push back for being too alarming and focusing on the worst case scenario. However, Oppenheimer explains that talking about the extreme cases has value in educating the public. 

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