Brian Lehrer WNYC

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Brian Lehrer leads the conversation about what matters most now in local and national politics, our own communities and our lives.
Updated: 11 min 29 sec ago

What Now For Dreamers?; Reaching Women Who Voted For Trump; New Jersey Bail Reform; Universal Basic Income

10 hours 20 min ago
    After the Senate failed to pass any kind of immigration reform last week Anu Joshi, Immigration Policy director at the New York Immigration Coalition, talks about the political steps needed to revive efforts to protect DACA recipients. Julie Kohler, senior vice president for the Democracy Alliance, a progressive donor group, and contributor to The Nation, tries to answer the question of why a majority of white women voted for Donald Trump and whether the #MeToo movement will change those votes. Last year, New Jersey essentially eliminated cash bail, and other states are looking to the Garden State to see how the new system is working. Nancy Solomon, managing editor of New Jersey Public Radio, and Alexander Shalom, senior supervising attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, talk about the changes, and the challenges that lie ahead. Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook, leader of the Obama campaign's digital efforts and co-founder of the Economic Security Project, argues that since the same forces that led to his enormous wealth make escaping poverty impossible for most.  His solution: a guaranteed basic income for all.

The Businessman President

Tue, 2018-02-20 12:09

Andrea Bernstein, senior editor for politics and policy for WNYC news, WNYC reporter Ilya Marritz and Jesse Eisinger, senior reporter at ProPublica, talk about their new podcast Trump, Inc., produced in partnership with ProPublica, that looks into the president's business practices 

The latest episode digs into the now-bankrupt and shuttered Trump Taj Mahal, once one of the biggest and glitziest casinos in the world, and tells a story of money laundering, "chaotic operations, massive debt, and a tendency to treat rules as more like suggestions."

The Making of a Black Feminist

Tue, 2018-02-20 12:03

Brittney Cooper, associate professor of women's and gender studies and Africana studies at Rutgers, Cosmo columnist, co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective and author of Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower (St. Martin's Press, 2018), examines how anger has fueled her development as a feminist.

#MeToo in the Art World

Tue, 2018-02-20 11:43

Priscilla Frank, arts and culture reporter for The Huffington Post discusses, the #MeToo Movement and how women's stories are impacting the art world.

thinking through those Balthus paintings was such an important exercise for me in college. What the hell.

— Lisa Kahlden (@ConsumerLaureat) February 20, 2018

It might be worth looking at Degas obsession with ballerinas-Museums depend on these images for attendance etc

— Jeremy Nadel (@jeremynadel) February 20, 2018

@BrianLehrer I don't think we should start tearing own art (or even sculptures of histsorical figures), but I personally have refused to view Picasso paintings ever since learning how he treated women at a MOMA (or Met?) Picasso exhibit many (20?) years ago.

— Lynda Adams (@MyRebut1) February 20, 2018

Robert Reich Wants to Make America "Good" Again

Tue, 2018-02-20 10:42

Robert Reich, professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, former Labor Secretary under Clinton, and the author of The Common Good  (Knopf, 2018), argues it's time to return to the ideals Americans share, writing, "If there is no common good, there is no society."

Today is my lucky day: @RBReich is the first guest on @BrianLehrer Show! pic.twitter.com/6PnNbSIHBe

— Julie Blattberg (@JulieBlattberg) February 20, 2018

Robert Reich; Trump, Inc.; Art and #MeToo; Eloquent Rage

Tue, 2018-02-20 00:00
    Robert Reich, professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and former Labor Secretary under Clinton, argues it's time to return to the ideals Americans share, writing, "If there is no common good, there is no society." Andrea Bernstein, senior editor for politics and policy for WNYC news, WNYC reporter Ilya Marritz and Jesse Eisinger, senior reporter at ProPublica, talk about their new podcast "Trump, Inc.", produced in partnership with ProPublica, that looks into the president's businesses. Priscilla Frank, arts and culture reporter for The Huffington Post, discusses the #MeToo Movement and how women's stories are impacting the art world. Brittney Cooper, professor of women's and gender studies and Africana studies at Rutgers, Cosmo columnist, co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective, examines how anger has fueled her development as a feminist.

"Catch and Kill" a Scandal

Mon, 2018-02-19 12:03

Ronan Farrow, investigative reporter at The New Yorker and HBO and author of the forthcoming book War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence (W. W. Norton & Company, 2018), talks about his latest New Yorker piece alleging a Playboy Playmate's affair with Donald Trump and a publisher's purchase of the story -- to stop its publication, a practice called "catch and kill."

Why Black Panther Matters

Mon, 2018-02-19 11:59

Rebecca Carroll, WNYC's Editor of Special Projects, critic at large for the LA Times, columnist at Shondaland.com, and author of five interview based books on race in America, discusses the new era for superheroes of color with the newly released Marvel film Black Panther.

Saw it with 26 yo daughter and 93 yo mother. Was struck by the splendor of being black and how the movie loved us so. No one loves us. The movie did.

— Denise Long (@Dionysia1717) February 19, 2018

@BrianLehrer #BlackPanther it gave me chills. Wonderful feeling and very empowering and uplifting. #WakandaForever pic.twitter.com/KYf7C328H5

— baba Erin (@BlakIzBack) February 19, 2018

“It’s beautiful work and it’s just what people want to see,” @rebel19 tells @BrianLehrer re: #BlackPanther and other Black films. Why don’t studios make more of them? “Systemic racism.”

— Brigid Bergin (@brigidbergin) February 19, 2018

A 'Right-to-Work' Case Comes to the Supreme Court

Mon, 2018-02-19 11:35

On February 26, the Supreme Court will hear arguments for the case Janus v. AFSCME, which challenges the mandatory union fees paid by government workers in states that do not have a right-to-work law (like NY & NJ).

Jacob Huebert, director of litigation at the Liberty Justice Center and the lawyer for the plaintiff in the upcoming Supreme Court case, argues his client's case for right-to-work laws.  

Then, Judith Rivlin AFSCME general counsel, responds to Huebert's arguments and explains how a Supreme Court ruling against AFSCME could affect New Yorkers.

Monday Morning Politics: Students Aim for Change in Gun Conversation

Mon, 2018-02-19 10:38

Since last week's deadly mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland Florida, surviving students emerged as a powerful political voice. Students spoke out on social media and to news cameras about violence and announced a march on Washington, and a school walk-out to demand gun control.

Philip Bump, Washington Post correspondent, takes your calls on the emerging resistance, Russian trolls, the immigration debate, and more.

 

Finally, Gen X proves they’ve done something really right... raising Gen Z to be bold, strong, empowered to speak up for what’s right... and with a steely, “just try me” resolve. And trust me, since we raised Gen Z, you can be guaranteed they’re just getting started.

— Jennifer Merritt (@MerrittJennifer) February 19, 2018

Hey, @BrianLehrer: FYI for your gun discussion right now, 250 people showed up to this protest in #WhitePlains. https://t.co/A8AoYAz0Ui

— Daniel Convissor (@danielconvissor) February 19, 2018

@BrianLehrer re blaming video games, tv and movies for gun violence: those same things are just as popular in Europe but where is their gun violence?

— Lambert Heenan (@Lheenan) February 19, 2018

Monday Morning Politics; A 'Right-to-Work' Case Comes to the Supreme Court; "Black Panther" reviewed

Mon, 2018-02-19 00:00
    Philip Bump, Washington Post correspondent, takes your calls on Russian trolls, the Parkland shooting, the immigration debate and more.  Ronan Farrow, investigative reporter at The New Yorker talks about his latest piece alleging a Playboy Playmate's affair with Donald Trump and a publisher's purchase of the story -- to stop its publication, a practice called "catch and kill." On February 26, the Supreme Court will hear arguments for the case Janus v. AFSCME, which challenges the mandatory union fees paid by government workers in states that do not have a right-to-work law (like NY & NJ). Judith Rivlin AFSCME general counsel and Jacob Huebert, director of litigation at the Liberty Justice Center and the lawyer for the plaintiff, lay out their respective sides. Rebecca Carroll, WNYC's Editor of Special Projects, critic at large for the LA Times, columnist at Shondaland.com, and author of five interview based books on race in America, discusses the new era for superheroes of color, and superhero films at large, with the newly released Marvel film Black Panther.

Brian Lehrer Weekend: What's Wrong in Politics and How to Fix It, Teens & Porn, Undocumented Immigrants in New Jersey

Fri, 2018-02-16 14:15

In case you missed them, hear three of our favorite segments from the week:

What's Wrong in Politics and How to Fix It (First) | Teens & Porn (Starts 24:30) | Undocumented Immigrants in New Jersey (Starts 46:43)

If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

How Women Lose Out in the Silicon Valley Boys' Club

Fri, 2018-02-16 12:02

Emily Chang, anchor and executive producer of Bloomberg Technology, a daily TV show focused on global technology and the interview show Bloomberg Studio 1.0, and the author of Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys' Club of Silicon Valley (Portfolio, 2018), talks about what made the tech explosion centered in Silicon Valley reject corporate norms -- including the ones developed in response to feminism. 

@emilychangtv: To this day, you have investors looking for people who look like Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates. Thinks of all the women who just didn't look the part.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

@emilychangtv reminds us that in the '40s + '50s, many programmers were women. But that changed in '60s + '70s when the industry went looking for workers who didn't like other people (psychologists said they'd be better programmers) -- those people wound up being men.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

@emilychangtv says Twitter founder @ev agreed harassment + trolling may not have been as much of a problem if women had been part of it from the beginning.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

The Olympics So Far

Fri, 2018-02-16 11:39

New York Times sports editor Jason Stallman recaps the first week of the Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, including who the big winners are, who the breakout stars are, and what's going on with the "Olympic Athletes from Russia."

Brian: How does one get into a sport like luge? Jason Stallman: You either grow up in a (cold) country where luge is a thing, or if you're in the US, you convert to luge when you realize you're not quite gonna make it in track + field or another sport.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

Reactions to the Florida Shooting, No Deal for Dreamers and More National News

Fri, 2018-02-16 11:03

USA TODAY Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page gives her take on the day's national political news -- including reactions to the school shooting in Parkland, Florida; immigration deals in the Senate that flamed out; and more on Trump's lawyer's payment to porn actress Stormy Daniels.

@SusanPage points out that one reason it's hard to get anything done on this is the people who turn out to vote are the people who want to protect 2nd Amendment rights at all costs.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

@SusanPage: It's so perplexing to Americans that Congress can't seem to do *anything* on gun control. Even seemingly minor things like banning bump stocks.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

On immigration deal that would have protected Dreamers w/money for his wall, @SusanPage says it fell apart because President Trump actively opposed it. Says if *that* couldn't pass, it's really not looking good for Dreamers any time soon.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

Ask the Mayor: School Safety; NYCHA Issues; Police Officer Acquittal; and More

Fri, 2018-02-16 10:36

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in NYC -- including news that Sgt. Hugh Barry was acquitted in the killing of Bronx woman Deborah Danner; issues surrounding NYCHA funding; plans to close Rikers; and how to protect NYC schools in the wake of the Florida school shooting.

On Sgt. Hugh Barry's acquittal, @NYCMayor says Deborah Danner "should still be alive." Says we have to make sure this doesn't happen again. But he respects the judicial decision.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

"I would always welcome help done on a collegial basis... but unfortunately here we see some real contradictions," Mayor tells @BrianLehrer when asked about idea of @NYGovCuomo declaring state of emergency for NYCHA.

— Grace Rauh (@gracerauh) February 16, 2018

BdB open to emergency declaration if it would help the ppl in public housing, he tells @BrianLehrer, but uncertain about legal details and politics involved. Says he wants to see more communication and action from Cuomo admin.

— Ben Max (@TweetBenMax) February 16, 2018

Responding to listener question about police violence, @NYCMayor says last year, a police officer only used gun in an "adversarial situation" 23 times. Says new training is focused on de-escalating tension + that this approach is working.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 16, 2018

Does the @NYCMayor hear this @NYCSpeakerCoJo backing away from the location in the Bronx: "No, not at all."

— Brigid Bergin (@brigidbergin) February 16, 2018

Ask the Mayor; National Politics; The Olympics So Far; Silicon Valley Frat Party

Fri, 2018-02-16 00:00

Coming up on today's show: 

    Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City, takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in NYC. Susan Page, Washington bureau chief for USA TODAY, gives her take on the latest national political news. New York Times sports editor Jason Stallman recaps the first week or so of the Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, including who the big winners are, who the breakout stars are, and what's going on with the "Olympic Athletes from Russia." Emily Chang, anchor and executive producer of Bloomberg Technology, a daily TV show focused on global technology and the interview show Bloomberg Studio 1.0, and the author of Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys' Club of Silicon Valley (Portfolio, 2018), talks about what made the tech explosion centered in Silicon Valley reject corporate norms including the ones developed in response to feminism.

 

An 'Accidental' Adjunct's Story

Thu, 2018-02-15 12:13

Lisa del Rosso, adjunct professor at New York University and author of Confessions of an Accidental Professor (Serving House Books, 2017), talks about her career as an adjunct writing instructor. 

President Trump Addresses the Nation on Florida Shooting

Thu, 2018-02-15 11:44

President Trump addresses the nation on yesterday's school shooting in Parkland, Florida. New York Times op-ed columnist David Leonhardt previews the speech by discussing the shooting and gun violence here in the United States. And WNYC's Amira Nader, who attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, talks about the school and reacts to the news from her hometown. Plus: The Guardian reporter Lois Beckett, who covers guns and gun violence, criminal justice and the far right, reports on the shooting and also previews -- and reacts to -- the president's speech.

"As on immigration, look at what he's doing. That's more important than what he's saying," says @DLeonhardt, regarding the president and gun violence.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 15, 2018

Sobering reminder from @DLeonhardt: No other country has this problem. The only logical explanation...is that it is our prevalence of guns and our lax gun laws that allow these mass shootings, that happen in no other rich country in the world.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 15, 2018

The school shootings clearly strike us all in an emotional way...but it's important to remember schools are actually the safest place for children, says @GuardianUS reporter @loisbeckett.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 15, 2018

@realDonaldTrump did not mention guns in his speech. He did mention mental health, culture, importance of family, faith. Now: @GuardianUS reporter @loisbeckett is back to react to his speech.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 15, 2018

@loisbeckett clarifies a few things: What we know from research is that even if you could miraculously cure *all* mental illness, the amount of violence wouldn't go down all that much. People dealing with mental health are more likely to be victims of violence than perpetrators.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 15, 2018

NYCHA Residents and the State of the City

Thu, 2018-02-15 11:00

Claudia Perez, Community Voices Heard member and president of the tenant's association at the Washington Houses, and Gabriel Strachota, lead organizer of the NYC chapter of Community Voices Heard, talk about the organization's calls for a NYCHA resident-led oversight committee and greater funding for repairs.

@CVHaction organizer Gabriel Strachota says Mayor de Blasio has a chance to create a real progressive alternative -- fully fund repairs in public housing + create a resident oversight council so people on the ground can deal with these problems.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) February 15, 2018

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